California School News July 2017 : Page 2

2 California school n ews July 2017 advocacy What to watch for in final weeks school n ews of 2017 legislative session California Before the Senate and Assembly adjourned for their annual summer recess in July, educa-tion and other policy committees in both houses finished hearing the majority of this year’s remaining fiscal bills. Once the summer recess ends in mid-August, legislators have four weeks to conclude their business and pass bills on to Gov. Jerry Brown’s desk by Sept. 15. Perhaps the most high-profile issue the Legislature will consider is a mandatory 8:30 a.m. or later start time for California’s nearly 3,000 middle and high schools. Senate Bill 328 (Portantino, D-La Cañada Flintridge) is currently in the Assembly Appropriations Committee, where it will be evaluated for its fiscal impact on school districts. While CSBA encourages school districts to review avail-able research to determine if a change in start times is the right fit, CSBA opposes SB 328 because of the one-size-fits-all mandate that inherently dismisses the local circumstances of 1,000 school districts and county offices of education. both withdrew similar bills — AB 1220 and A B 1164 , respectively — from the Senate Education Committee’s July 12 agenda; each would have added a third probationary year for newly hired teachers. Both bills remain in the Senate Education Committee, which is not cur-rently scheduled to meet again in 2017. staff Senior Director of Communications: Troy Flint | tflint@csba.org Managing Editor: Kimberly Sellery | ksellery@csba.org Marketing Director: Serina Pruitt | spruitt@csba.org Staff Writers and Contributors: Hugh Biggar | hbiggar@csba.org Aaron Davis | adavis@csba.org Corrie Jacobs | cjacobs@csba.org Graphic Design Manager: Kerry Macklin | kmacklin@csba.org Senior Graphic Designer: Carmen Rodriguez | crodriguez@csba.org Charter schools SB 765 (Weiner, D-San Francisco), which is opposed by CSBA, was originally scheduled to be heard in the Assembly Education Committee on July 12; the bill was postponed to July 19 but again not heard by the committee, where the bill remains. SB 765 would grant charter schools the right of first refusal to acquire district real estate property which has been deemed “surplus.” Another charter-related bill of concern is AB 1217 (Bocanegra, D-Pacoima) which currently sits in Senate Appropriations. The bill would establish an independently run state Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics school in Los Angeles County. While not tech-nically a charter school, it would operate under a very similar structure without going through any of the authorization processes currently in place. CSBA opposes the bill, which would set a precedent that could allow charters to circum-vent school district, county offices of education and State Board of Education oversight by allowing the Legislature to act as an authorizer. officers President: Susan Henry | Huntington Beach Union HSD President-elect: Mike Walsh | Butte COE Immediate Past President: Chris Ungar | San Luis Coastal USD CEO & Executive Director: Vernon M. Billy CSBA-sponsored bills Also residing in the Assembly Appropriations Committee are a pair of CSBA-sponsored bills, both of which have received unanimous “Aye” votes thus far. The first bill, SB 527 (Galgiani, D-Stockton), would add a statutory cost-of-living adjustment for home-to-school transportation and provide significant relief for California school dis-tricts — in particular, small districts in rural areas — that are struggling with skyrocketing transportation costs. The second CSBA-sponsored bill is SB 751 (Hill & Glazer), which fixes the school district reserve cap by exempting basic aid districts and small districts from the cap, raising the reserve limit to 17 percent and clarifying which funds the cap applies to. Assembly Bill 235 (O’Donnell, D-Long Beach), another reserve cap bill, also remains active. CSBA is seeking amendments to align AB 235 with SB 751 — of particular importance is how small districts are defined. While both bills exempt small and basic aid districts, CSBA’s bill exempts small districts of 2,501 average daily attendance or less, while AB 235 uses a narrower definition that would still leave many financially vulnerable districts defenseless against the effects of the current reserve cap law. Fiscal transparency Following recent amendments, CSBA now supports AB 1321 (Weber, D-San Diego), which endeavors to improve fiscal transparency in the public reporting of Local Control Funding Formula spending by school districts. As amended, the bill will make data more easily accessible and understandable for the public by aligning it with existing federal law, which requires disaggregated reporting of funds at the school site level, broken out by federal, state and local sources. The California School Boards Association is the essential voice for public education. We inspire our members to be knowledgeable leaders, extraordinary governance practitioners and ardent advocates for all students. California School News (ISSN 1091-1715) is published 11 times per year by the California School Boards Association, Inc., 3251 Beacon Blvd., West Sacramento, CA 95691. 916-371-4691. $4 of CSBA annual member-ship dues is for the subscription to California School News. The subscription rate for each CSBA nonmember is $35. Periodicals postage paid at West Sacramento, CA and at additional mailing office. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to California School News, 3251 Beacon Blvd., West Sacramento, CA 95691. News and feature items submitted for publication are edited for style and space as necessary. Correction: The June issue of California School News featured an article titled “CSBA to host LCFF/LCAP private learning networks.” The title should have read “CSBA to host LCFF/LCAP professional learning networks.” Next Steps The majority of fiscal bills requiring an appropriation of funds now reside in the Senate and Assembly Appropriations Committees’ sus-pense files. Both committees will hold suspense hearings in late August, determining which fiscal bills will advance to Senate and Assembly floor votes and which will be held. Visit www.csba.org/legislativenews for CSBA’s positions on 2017 legislation and more updates on key bills. Teacher probation Assemblymembers Shirley Weber (D-San Diego) and Tony Thurmond (D-Richmond)

What To Watch For In Final Weeks Of 2017 Legislative Session

Before the Senate and Assembly adjourned for their annual summer recess in July, education and other policy committees in both houses finished hearing the majority of this year’s remaining fiscal bills. Once the summer recess ends in mid-August, legislators have four weeks to conclude their business and pass bills on to Gov. Jerry Brown’s desk by Sept. 15.

Perhaps the most high-profile issue the Legislature will consider is a mandatory 8:30 a.m. or later start time for California’s nearly 3,000 middle and high schools. Senate Bill 328 (Portantino, D-La Cañada Flintridge) is currently in the Assembly Appropriations Committee, where it will be evaluated for its fiscal impact on school districts. While CSBA encourages school districts to review available research to determine if a change in start times is the right fit, CSBA opposes SB 328 because of the one-size-fits-all mandate that inherently dismisses the local circumstances of 1,000 school districts and county offices of education.

CSBA-sponsored bills

Also residing in the Assembly Appropriations Committee are a pair of CSBA sponsored bills, both of which have received unanimous “Aye” votes thus far. The first bill, SB 527 (Galgiani, D-Stockton), would add a statutory cost-of-living adjustment for home-to-school transportation and provide significant relief for California school districts — in particular, small districts in rural areas — that are struggling with skyrocketing transportation costs.

The second CSBA-sponsored bill is SB 751 (Hill & Glazer), which fixes the school district reserve cap by exempting basic aid districts and small districts from the cap, raising the reserve limit to 17 percent and clarifying which funds the cap applies to. Assembly Bill 235 (O’Donnell, D-Long Beach), another reserve cap bill, also remains active. CSBA is seeking amendments to align AB 235 with SB 751 — of particular importance is how small districts are defined. While both bills exempt small and basic aid districts, CSBA’s bill exempts small districts of 2,501 average daily attendance or less, while AB 235 uses a narrower definition that would still leave many financially vulnerable districts defenseless against the effects of the current reserve cap law.

Teacher probation

Assemblymembers Shirley Weber (D-San Diego) and Tony Thurmond (D-Richmond) both withdrew similar bills — AB 1220 and AB 1164, respectively — from the Senate Education Committee’s July 12 agenda; each would have added a third probationary year for newly hired teachers. Both bills remain in the Senate Education Committee, which is not currently scheduled to meet again in 2017.

Charter schools

SB 765 (Weiner, D-San Francisco), which is opposed by CSBA, was originally scheduled to be heard in the Assembly Education Committee on July 12; the bill was postponed to July 19 but again not heard by the committee, where the bill remains. SB 765 would grant charter schools the right of first refusal to acquire district real estate property which has been deemed “surplus.”

Another charter-related bill of concern is AB 1217 (Bocanegra, D-Pacoima) which currently sits in Senate Appropriations. The bill would establish an independently run state Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics school in Los Angeles County. While not technically a charter school, it would operate under a very similar structure without going through any of the authorization processes currently in place. CSBA opposes the bill, which would set a precedent that could allow charters to circumvent school district, county offices of education and State Board of Education oversight by allowing the Legislature to act as an authorizer.

Fiscal transparency

Following recent amendments, CSBA now supports AB 1321 (Weber, D-San Diego), which endeavors to improve fiscal transparency in the public reporting of Local Control Funding Formula spending by school districts. As amended, the bill will make data more easily accessible and understandable for the public by aligning it with existing federal law, which requires disaggregated reporting of funds at the school site level, broken out by federal, state and local sources.

Next Steps

The majority of fiscal bills requiring an appropriation of funds now reside in the Senate and Assembly Appropriations Committees’ suspense files. Both committees will hold suspense hearings in late August, determining which fiscal bills will advance to Senate and Assembly floor votes and which will be held. Visit www.csba.org/legislativenews for CSBA’s positions on 2017 legislation and more updates on key bills.

Read the full article at http://news.csba.org/article/What+To+Watch+For+In+Final+Weeks+Of+2017+Legislative+Session/2849890/429900/article.html.

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